Where to Donate to Harvey Victims (and How to Avoid Scams)

Christina Caron, The New York Times
August 28, 2017

A large and complicated rescue operation is underway in Houston as floodwaters continue to rise, fed by unrelenting rain.

So far, there’s no end in sight.

Tropical Storm Harvey is expected to produce 7 to 13 more inches of rain through Friday over the upper Texas coast, where some areas — including the Houston metropolitan area — may see accumulations of up to 50 inches.

29xp-charity-articleLarge

A temporary shelter set up at the George R. Brown Convention Center in downtown Houston. Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times

Here are options to help.

Read The Rest

Watch Out for Charity Scams After Orlando Shooting

Excerpt of USA Today article by Brooke Niemeyer, Credit.com

In the wake of the Orlando shooting, many want to help victims and their families by giving donations. Unfortunately, scammers may try to take advantage of their kindness.

“Scammers depend on heightened emotion and often follow closely behind tragic events,” Holly Salmons, President and CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Central Florida, said in a press release.

In these situations, crowdfunding sites can be set up quickly to collect donations. Because these sites aren’t generally vetted, anyone may be able to set one up, including scammers, which we saw following the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

If you are considering making a donation to the Orlando shooting victims, the Better Business Bureau encourages you to be safe online. Don’t click on links you aren’t familiar with, and be sure to check the URL for accuracy. Scammers often register a misspelled version of a popular website to lure people who hit the wrong key. (You can read more about how to spot an internet scam here.)

Here are a few other things you should be aware of:

Vague appeals: If the site doesn’t explain how they intend to use the funds being donated or say when they’ll be used, the Better Business Bureau says it’s a red flag.

Government registration: The majority of states require charities register with a state government agency before soliciting, so be sure you’re giving to a registered charity.

Family funds: Families may set up their own assistance fund, so it won’t be registered with the government, but the Better Business Bureau says to make sure the money is received and administered by a third party (like a bank, CPA or lawyer), as this will help ensure the funds are used appropriately.

Transparency: A charity should clearly account for the funds they receive and how they’re spent after they’re raised.

Click Here for the full article: